Monday, October 15, 2007

Do Managers Matter?

Filip Bondy says no:
Managing isn't that complicated. This is baseball. American League baseball. A coach tells you when the pitch count reaches 90. The data sheet tells you how a certain batter has done against a certain pitcher. You inform the first baseman why you're benching him, before you tell the media.

This is no big deal. It's hilarious to read all the concerns out there now about Mattingly's alleged inexperience. The guy played with the Yankees for 14 years. He's coached with them for four years. He's smart. He's steady. You really think he doesn't know when to flash a steal sign, or when to hold a team meeting?

Torre would do just fine, too, if he comes back. His ultimate success will depend on the team's overall makeup, on the young starters' progress.
What say you?

4 comments:

joe said...

It's a lot easier for a manager to have a detrimental impact (like over-using certain relievers to the point of injury) than a positive one. But the bottom line is the players seem to enjoy playing for Torre, and with so many seemingly on the fence about whether to return, that familiarity could be the deciding factor in whether they stay or go. At this point, Torre's greatest asset is his use as a bargaining chip in negotiations with players.

Brucie G said...

I absolutely agree. Baseball managers do pretty much nothing. But like Joe said, if he's gonna be the reason Mo and Pettitte stay, than I want him back.

priv8pete said...

And if he stays I want Joba in the rotation. Could you imagine Torre blowing out Joba's arm next May when he's brought into his 40th game?

Michael in New York said...

Hey, get some starters who don't thrill us by going five innings before you start complaining about a manager overusing his bullpen. (Same goes for Willie Randolph and the crap he took.) A quality start is SEVEN innings, not five. Every manager beats up on their bullpen when starting pitchers suck; I only heard moans when Torre used Farnsworth, not anyone saying "thank God he's not overusing the good pitchers."